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Ruby Rose On Batwoman's Romantic Relationships

June 4, 2019

 

In an interview with Adweek, Ruby Rose and Batwoman writer/showrunner Caroline Dries give new details about their groundbreaking show, which debuts on the CW on Sunday nights in Autumn.


According to Dries, during the casting process she thought Rose wouldn't be interested in playing Kate Kane/Batwoman.


“We always joked, ‘We need a Ruby Rose,’” Dries recalled. “And it was like, ‘That would be great, but that’s not going to happen. She’s a movie star.’”


But Rose told Adweek that she’s thrilled to be making history as the first out-lesbian superhero in a live-action show.


“When people see the show, they will understand why this character is so important to me and why after reading the script, it was a no-brainer that I would happily spend as long as I’m allowed to playing this character, over trying to find new ones,” Rose said.


“The story they’re telling me is so much more in-depth, real, grounded, heartbreaking and wilder than what I anticipated.”


Rose said that this superhero will be a tough but vulnerable one, with a backstory filled with heartbreak and lost love.


“There’s so much in it that I think friends, or me when I was younger, or fans, or anyone can watch and feel part of their story is being told.”


Dries told Adweek that bringing Kate Kane/Batwoman to the screen is a deeply personal experience for her.


“To have the super-strong badass lead character be the base of the show, and that her love story is the love story of the show, is so ground-breaking and so important to me, as somebody who’s gay.”


“If I’d had this show as a 15-year-old, my life would have been so different. It would’ve been so much less depressing, and it would’ve felt like I had so much more support.”


Both Rose and Dries are determined to present Kane’s relationships in both a realistic and matter-of-fact manner, just as any heterosexual relationships would be.


“There’s a way that television shows and films often depict any kind of new relationship when it’s a woman and a woman. It often has a beginning, middle and end that’s always the same,” said Rose.


“Like, ‘Oh, my gosh, you’re my best friend and we’re having a slumber party in high school!’ It’s fine, because that is a way that still represents and still speaks to a legitimate way that people get together in relationships. But it also feels like we have to do more explaining than when it’s just a heterosexual couple.”


Instead, Kane’s relationships “are never going to be that explained. It’s just going to be like anybody else,” said Rose.


“And that I love, because as much as I love representation in any way, shape or form, I don’t think I’ve seen it normalized as much as this.”

 

 

 

 

 

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